Sneak peak into the egyptian culture

This actually has quite a bit merit though I'd probably have gotten You Are What You Is first if I could do it all over again ; it has quite a few great, GREAT melodies, a bunch of neat sound effects that don't usually take total precedence over the music, and of course it has the concept and the accompanying lyrics. Yes, this is the infamous total bashing of "Flower Power" and hippies in general, the one with the band in drag and the inside cover containing an elaborate Sgt.

Sneak peak into the egyptian culture

Artistic rendering of Hassan-i Sabbah. The origins of the Assassins can be traced back to just before the First Crusadearound in Alamut, north of modern Iran, during a crisis of succession to the Fatimid caliphate.

However, it is possible to trace the beginnings of the cult back to its first Grandmaster, Hassan-i Sabbah s— A passionate devotee of Isma'ili beliefs, Hassan-i Sabbah was well-liked throughout CairoSyria and Sneak peak into the egyptian culture of the Middle East by other Isma'ili, which led to a number of people becoming his followers.

Using his fame and popularity, Sabbah founded the Order of the Assassins. While his motives for founding this order are ultimately unknown, it was said to be all for his own political and personal gain and to also exact vengeance on his enemies.

Because of the unrest in the Holy Land caused by the CrusadesHassan-i Sabbah found himself not only fighting for power with other Muslimsbut also with the invading Christian forces. The Alamut castle was built by the Justanid ruler, Wahsudan b. Marzuban, a follower of zaydi Shiaism, around AD.

After laying claim to the fortress at Alamut, Sabbah began expanding his influence outwards to nearby towns and districts, using his agents to gain political favour and to intimidate the local populations.

Spending most of his days at Alamut producing religious works and developing doctrines for his Order, Sabbah would never leave his fortress again in his lifetime. He had established a secret society of deadly assassins, which was built on a hierarchical structure.

It was the Lasiqs who were trained to become some of the most feared assassins, or as they were called, "Fida'in" self-sacrificing agents.

One theory, possibly the best known but also the most criticized, comes from the reports of Marco Polo during his travels to the Orient. He recounts a story he heard of a man who would drug his young followers with hashishlead them to a "paradise", and then claim that only he had the means to allow for their return.

Perceiving that Sabbah was either a prophet or magician, his disciples, believing that only he could return them to "paradise", were fully committed to his cause and willing to carry out his every request.

Assassins would rarely attack ordinary citizens though, and tended not to be hostile towards them. Although the "Fida'yin" were the lowest rank in Sabbah's order and were only used as expendable pawns to do the Grandmaster's bidding, much time and many resources were put into training them.

Sneak peak into the egyptian culture

The Assassins were generally young in age, giving them the physical strength and stamina which would be required to carry out these murders. However, physical prowess was not the only trait that was required to be a "Fida'i". To get to their targets, the Assassins had to be patient, cold, and calculating.

They were generally intelligent and well-read because they were required to possess not only knowledge about their enemy, but his or her culture and their native language. They were trained by their masters to disguise themselves and sneak into enemy territory to perform the assassinations, instead of simply attacking their target outright.

The "Asasyun" plural, literary Arabic, official texts, proper form were as defined in Arabic; people of principle. It is far more likely to be a mispronunciation of the original Asasyun. However, not a mispronunciation of "asaseen".

One can therefore see how its origins became assassin in Western languages. Originally referring to the methods of political control exercised by the Asasyun as defined by their activities and Later, the almost identical borrowed term assassin s used in several languages to describe similar activities anywhere.

The Assassins were finally linked by the 19th-century orientalist scholar Silvestre de Sacy to the Arabic word hashish using their variant names assassin and assissini in the 19th century. Citing the example of one of the first written applications of the Arabic term hashish to the Ismailis by 13th-century historian Abu Shama, de Sacy demonstrated its connection to the name given to the Ismailis throughout Western scholarship.

This label was quickly adopted by anti-Ismaili historians and applied to the Ismailis of Syria and Persia. The spread of the term was further facilitated through military encounters between the Nizaris and the Crusaderswhose chroniclers adopted the term and disseminated it across Europe.

During the medieval period, Western scholarship on the Ismailis contributed to the popular view of the community as a radical sect of assassins, believed to be trained for the precise murder of their adversaries.

By the 14th century, European scholarship on the topic had not advanced much beyond the work and tales from the Crusaders. While he assembled the accounts of many Western travellers, the author failed to explain the etymology of the term Assassin. Many scholars have argued, and demonstrated convincingly, that the attribution of the epithet "hashish eaters" or "hashish takers" is a misnomer derived from enemies of the Isma'ilis and was never used by Muslim chroniclers or sources.

It was therefore used in a pejorative sense of "enemies" or "disreputable people". This sense of the term survived into modern times with the common Egyptian usage of the term Hashasheen in the s to mean simply "noisy or riotous". It is unlikely that the austere Hassan-i Sabbah indulged personally in drug taking Modern versions of this word include Mahashish used in the same derogatory sense, albeit less offensive nowadays, as the use of the substance is more widespread.

He is their Elder, and upon his command all of the men of the mountain come out or go in One such method was that of assassination, the selective elimination of prominent rival figures.Nov 01,  · This short clip is a brief peak into culture at Perkbox - a philosophy we not only sell, but practise too.

Essay on Egyptian Culture Words | 6 Pages. Culture in Egypt is rich and deep.

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Having one of the oldest cultures dating back to before the pharaohs; Egypt’s culture is well developed and distinctive.

With a religious cultured background, Egypt is developing rapidly into a . Reviews, essays, books and the arts: the leading international weekly for literary culture. Neil Gaiman's bestseller, now on Amazon and Starz - American Gods, featuring videos, photos, episode information, and more.

Sneak Peak: Inside Kourtney Kardashian’s Luxurious Visit to Egypt With Algerian Boyfriend Younes Bendjima. Kari Megeed. August 9, Sneak Peak: Inside Kourtney Kardashian’s Luxurious Visit to Egypt With Algerian Boyfriend Younes Bendjima News a sneak peak into their holiday, saying that Kourtney met with friends in Florida, then.

One of several processional crosses that were among the items looted during the British campaign in Ethiopia in (Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum).

Sneak peak into the egyptian culture
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